About the Library

City East

The Library is located in the Brookman Building at City East. Collection strengths include Health Sciences.

  • Level 3, Brookman Building, Corner of Frome Road and North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000 | map

    Today’s Opening Hours
    8:00 AM - 6:00 PM

    View future opening hours for all campuses

    Floor Plan
    Level 3
    Level 4
    Mezzanine

  • There is a service point near the main entrance, on the left as you pass the computer pool – pick up the phone and call the number listed on the monitor for Library or IT help.

    Staff can assist over the phone, by video call or in person.

    You can also get help from wherever you are in the Library by phone, email or chat using the Ask the Library Service.

    Watch the video on how to get help in the Library.

  • Self-Check Machines
    All items, apart from laptops, can be borrowed at the self-check machines.

    There are two machines on the ground floor:

    • one near the main entrance and photocopiers
    • one in the corridor to the right of the computer pools

    Holds
    Holds can be collected from the holds shelf in the corridor on the ground floor opposite the lift, and borrowed at any self-check machine.

    Returns
    Items from any campus, apart from laptops and oversized items, can be returned through the returns chutes

    • There is a chute on the outside of the building to the left of the Library entrance and one just inside the Library opposite the service point
    • Oversized items that do not fit in the return chute can be returned during opening hours – use a service point to call for assistance

    Laptop loans
    Laptops can be borrowed and returned using the self-service unit on level 3 in the corridor opposite computer barn B3-30.

  • There are a variety of spaces in the library for teaching, individual study and group work. See the Study Spaces page for more information.

    Collaborative teaching space: Level 4

    Training room: Level 4 (Doris Taylor Wing)

    Computer pools: Level3, Level 4 Training room, Mezzanine

    Study rooms: Level 3 (large room), Level 4

    Silent study zones: Level 3 (B3-22), Level 4 Training room (when not in use for training)

    Quiet study zones: Level 4 Doris Taylor Wing

    Group Study zones: Level 3 (B3-33), Level 4 Main Wing, Mezzanine

    Informal zone: Level 3

  • Printers (photocopying/scanning)
    Printers are on levels 3 and 4 and the mezzanine.

    Stationery
    The following stationery equipment and supplies are provided for student use:

    • Staplers, guillotine and hole punch: near the printers on the ground floor
    • Binder and stapler: upstairs to the right of the lift
  • David Murray Library
    The South Australian School of Mines, established in 1889, initially had no library. David Murray, an Adelaide politician and philanthropist with a keen interest in technical education, was persuaded to support the establishment of a library. He presented a cheque for £500 and the School Council agreed to name the new library after him. After visiting the library, opened in 1903, he donated a further £500 for resources. Upon his death in 1906 a further £1000 was received as a bequest from his estate.

    While the School of Mines evolved into the South Australian Institute of Technology and later in 1991 formed part of the new University of South Australia, the Library retained its original title, the David Murray Library. The original site of the Library is now occupied by the Library’s Multi Access Suite on Level 4.

    Doris Taylor Wing
    This wing occupies a section of the Centenary Building at City East campus. This building was opened in 1989 and the wing was generously donated to the Library by the School of Nursing, being linked to the existing David Murray Library with a corridor. The wing now houses health information and resources.

    Doris Taylor (1901-1968) was wheelchair bound from the age of twelve as the result of a childhood accident, but went on to become the founder of the Meals on Wheels Service, begun at Port Adelaide in 1953. Despite also suffering from severe rheumatoid arthritis, Doris managed to live independently at home throughout her life, and was acutely aware of the assistance needed by elderly, ill and disadvantaged people in their daily lives. She campaigned for improved social services for these groups as well as working tirelessly to promote and expand Meals on Wheels, which became a model for other states and countries to follow.

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